A Foolproof Formula For A Good 2000-Word Argumentative Essay

Are you biting your lip, pulling your hair out and feeling dizzy at the thought of having to write a 2000-word argumentative essay? Well don’t worry, for there is always help available. Here’s a foolproof formula to writing that really good essay you know you are capable of writing:

Make a schedule – and stick to it!

Get organized! The very first thing you need to do is make a schedule; and it should be one that you know you can stick to! Give yourself adequate time for each part of the process and things will go swimmingly.

Picking a topic.

With an argumentative essay, you get to have an opinion about something. You need to select a topic that you know a lot about and which you’re passionate about, and you need to be able to back up your claims by quoting plenty of other sources. You’ll also need to mention what the opposing views are. The purpose of this paper is to get your reader on your side of the debate, so select your topic wisely.

Create an outline.

Once you have chosen your topic, conducted your research and made notes, you should come up with an outline for your paper. The bulk of your paper will be the body text, made up of chapters. Work out what information belongs together, what each chapter is about and what should go where. The more time you spend planning this, the easier it will be to write the essay.

Remember that this paper is 2000 words long, so take that into account at this planning stage. Estimate how many words you will need for each part (the introduction, the chapters and the conclusion).

Questions to ask yourself when writing the first draft.

When writing the first draft of the paper, you should pay attention to the following: Is my argument well-balanced? Why do people of the opposite opinion believe that and have they good cause? Why am I right? Have I given enough quotes and sources to back up what I am saying?

The more balanced and well thought out your paper is, the better.

The importance of the conclusion.

Don’t overlook how important the conclusion is! This belongs at the end and it should restate the aims and objectives, summarize your key points to make a cohesive argument, and conclude in a manner which leaves your reader taking your side of the argument.